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The Best of Cinema 2010-19

Although I belong to the school of thought the numeral system begins with 1 and not 0, since the entire world is betrothed to the idea of a new decade beginning 2020, I thought of sharing my favourite films of the past ten years. If there is one thing that this decade (ahem) 2010-19 has shaped in me, is the love for cinema.

So, here goes:

2010

Bengali – Abahaman

English – Inception

Hindi – Guzarish

2011

Bengali – Baishe Srabon

English – Midnight in Paris

Hindi – Zindagi Na Milegi Dobara

2012

Bengali – Chitrangada

English – Argo

Hindi – Gangs of Wasseypur

2013

Bengali – Shobdo/Bakita Byaktigoto/Phoring

English – Gravity

Hindi – Lootera

2014

Bengali – Jatishwar/Chotushkone/Asha Jaoyar Majhe/Apur Panchali

English – Interstellar, Birdman

Hindi – Haider

2015

Bengali – Nirbaak, Belaseshe, Abby Sen

English – The Martian, The Man From Uncle, The Bridge of Spies

Hindi – Masaan, Dil Dhadakne Do

2016

Bengali – Cinemawala

English – Moonlight

Hindi – Pink, Parched

2017

Bengali – Bishorjon, Dhananjoy, Mayurakshi

English – Dunkirk, Call Me By Your Name

Hindi – Tumhari Sulu, Newton

2018

Bengali – Rainbow Jelly, Pupa, Ek Je Chilo Raja

English – The Favourite

Hindi – Mulk

2019

Bengali – Rajlokkhi O Srikanto, Nagarkirtan

English – Marriage Story

Hindi – Soni

 

Movie Review – Vinci Da by Srijit Mukherji

 

The Übermensch (meaning super-human) is a concept developed by philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. In his book ‘Thus Spake Zaruthastra’ Nietzsche describes how God is dead and it is up to the Übermensch to set the world in order, for a better future. Srijit Mukherji borrows this concept in his latest venture ‘Vinci Da’ – a psychological thriller that questions the very concept of what is good and evil.

Vinci Da is the story of a mentally-deranged man Adi Bose, who considers himself Nietzsche’s Übermensch. A ‘lawyer’ by choice, Adi had a troubled childhood (having murdered his own father, just half an hour before turning 18; thus avoiding capital punishment) – more of that later. Adi Bose is law unto himself, who does not care about a few ‘collateral damages’ in this war against law-breakers who escape justice because of the corrupt system.

To bring his ‘noble cause’ to fruition, Adi Bose hires the services of a prosthetics make-up artist in Tollywood – Vinci Da. A Leonardo Da Vinci fanatic, Vinci Da finds it hard to find work in Tolly-para because of his uprightness and refusal to budge from the righteous stand. Inadvertently, his artistic acumen suffers as he is forced to earn a livelihood by working for local drama companies. It is not a surprise that he laps up the proposal of a challenging work from Adi Bose, which will demonstrate to the world the wonders he has up his sleeves.

What follows is an intense Ken and Abel-esque clash between two ideas. Vinci Da is torn between his artistic enterprises and the hapless suffering the innocent ‘collaterals’ have to bear. Adi Bose, on the other hand, metamorphoses from the vigilante who wants to rid the society from law-breakers into a shrewd, manipulative, power-hungry villain who would stop at nothing. In signature-Srijit Mukherji style, the duel enters the final act with a bang and curtains fall with a dramatic twist. Fate has the artist imprisoned in his own work.

‘Vinci Da’ may not be Srijit Mukherji’s best work, but surely is among the front-runners to qualify as his best five films. With power-packed performances by the two leading actors, hard-hitting dialogues (a forte of Srijit Mukherji), spellbinding art direction, foot-tapping music by Anupam Roy and the brilliant use of lighting in some scenes, Vinci Da easily makes an impact. The chemistry that Ritwick Chakraborty (Adi Bose) and Rudranil Ghosh (Vinci Da) share would remind one of Feluda and Maganlal Meghraj.

There are scenes in the film, which stay with you. The dream sequence where Leonardo Da Vinci is painting Mona Lisa – with Rudranil and Sohini’s voiceovers, or the sequence before the interval where Adi Bose demolishes Vinci Da’s reverence from Da Vinci, are truly of international standards. And then, there is the gruesome murder sequence in the beginning of the film. Riddhi Sen hits the ball out of the stadium as young Adi Bose.

Alas, after all the memes and videos on DCDD Poddar, one had to satisfy themselves with a scene or two of the enigmatic character – forever in pursuit of Bose and Vinci Da. Even in his short presence on screen, Anirban Bhattacharya is a beacon that shines bright. As does Sohini Sarkar as Vinci Da’s love interest, and a pivotal character who significantly influences the game of nerves between Adi Bose and Vinci Da. The hasty climax and jarring background score in some scenes are the only sore-points in an otherwise Srijit-esque thriller.

As I had said in my immediate reaction on Facebook after watching the film, Vinci Da is more psychological than thriller. The film provokes you to think and question your belief-systems. Notwithstanding Nietzsche and Übermensch, Vinci Da is also a socio-political commentary on the daily mockery of democracy in our country, that has become the mainstay.

May be, our very own Übermensch will rise from within.

My Rating: 3.5/5 stars

DISCLAIMER: All Images Used In This Post Have Their Respective Copyrights

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