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Book Review: Prisoner, Jailor, Prime Minister by Tabrik C

book reviewPolitics runs in my blood. My enthusiasm for the dark yet mindboggling game of nerves in politics is similar to that of a kid for a teddy bear. The plot of Prisoner, Jailor, Prime Minister is set in 2016 – when India goes for sudden mid-term polls and Siddhartha Tagore is elected as the Prime Minister of the country. Mixing fiction with reality, Tabrik C weaves a tale so enchanting that it is difficult to put down the book.

The plot is about the future prime minister of India, who is a Harvard Alumni and whose dad was an MP. More interestingly, Sidhartha Tagore is a brilliant musician, who is respected worldwide for his concerts. Sidhartha is known to take some tough decisions and stands, which wins him enemies both within and outside the country.

Although ‘Prisoner Jailor Prime Minister’ is a fiction, it occasionally refers to real political parties and people. Sidhartha has a dark past and he is a prisoner of his own soul. As pages unfold and the secrets are revealed the fiction starts bordering on fantasy. Too many liberties are taken in the narrative which are hard to swallow (like characters moving in and out of 7 RCR at will, that too in Harley Davidsons!)

Although as a subplot, the writer has warned India of the consequences if a certain right wing party comes to power. Constitutional changes, return to the “roots” and other such catastrophic ideas are explored, which make the narrative slightly edgy. However by the time the writer ties up all his loose ends, he himself appears in knots, resulting in a shoddy ending.

Some traits of human behaviour and psyche are well explored though. Like schizophrenia or latent homosexual tendencies. Secrets that are often buried behind closets find a place in the book, in full grace. I must congratulate Tabrik for such mature handling of sensitive issues.

Overall, the book is best suited for a lengthy train ride.

My Rating: 3/5 stars

P.S. This review was written as a part of the Flipkart Bloggers Affiliate Programme. Thanks Vivek for the books 🙂

About the book

India has a new Prime Minister but is Siddhartha Tagore the product of his genius or of his dangerous mind? India is on edge, as a subversive internal revolt against the Constitution and the threat of Jehadi terror of an unthinkable level, are looming on the horizon. Ringing Shiva’s damaru in and out of Parliament, a sudden turn of karma catapults outsider Siddhartha Tagore – a conflicted genius, music maestro and prodigal son, with forceful views on China and Pakistan into national prominence as the head of the Opposition Alliance and finally as the newly elected Prime Minister of a disturbed nation. But buried secrets are being resurrected and threaten to expose the past. Twisted within the double helix of menacing politics and hidden lust, Prisoner, Jailor, Prime Minister is a scorching account of Siddhartha Tagore’s fascinating journey from Harvard to 7 Race Course Road.

About the author

Tabrik C is a political enthusiast, perfumer and internet entrepreneur. He has a post-graduate degree in History from St. Stephen’s College Delhi, where he was the president of the student’s union. His special interest lies in observing, analyzing, predicting and debating the rise and fall of political personalities and their influence on the destiny of nations and individuals.

India needs a Prime Minister

Pranab Mukherjee

Courtesy Sulekha dot com

The title of this post might surprise some, while come across as unsurprising to many, but standing at the crossroads of another year end, there is no denying the fact that India needs more than just a figurative head. Prime Minister Manmohan Singh has failed to inspire citizens with leadership and has reduced the post of executive head of the nation to ceremonial face which appears on hoardings and government advertisements.

Question naturally arises who should lead the government then? Which politician in current Indian political situation possesses the caliber to lead India towards prosperity? Is it India’s “crown Prince” Rahul Gandhi? Or Madam Sonia Gandhi? Or someone else?

Rahul Gandhi is too immature to take up the mantle as grave as the Prime Ministerial berth. He could, rather, make his way up starting with running a state (eg U.P.). That could well be an apprenticeship which can mold him for future responsibilities.

His mother and chairperson of the United Progressive Alliance is also better kept away from the PM’s office. Although it is an open secret that calls the shots in matters of national policy, but her ascent to the “chair” will spell trouble for the nation. The Party and The Government better be kept separate institutions and she can look after the party affairs.

India’s hunt for a Prime Minister ends with a very senior parliamentarian and also a senior minister of the present government. Pranab Mukherjee, in all fairness is the acting Prime Minister of UPA 2.

According to this article published in The Times Of India, Pranab Mukherjee is part of 34 Group of Ministers (GoM) heading 15 of them. He was most recently made head of the Joint Drafting Committee of the Lokpal Bill. Pranab Mukherjee is the Leader of the House in the Lok Sabha. On more than one occasions, this senior parliamentarian has emerged as the crisis manager for the UPA. His equations with various political outfits (across the colour spectrum) is known to be relatively better than his party colleagues. He has the distinction of holding ministries ranging from Defence to Finance, External Affairs, Revenue, Shipping, Transport, Communication, Economic Affairs, Commerce and Industry.

Rumours say, Pranab Mukherjee was a strong contender for the Prime Ministerial berth in the early 1980s. When Indira Gandhi was assassinated, a section of the Congress projected him as the Prime Minister in waiting. But given its sycophantic nature, the Congress fell back to the first family of Indian politics. The altercations were such that Pranab Mukherjee was forced to quit the party he had served for decades. Although he returned back to the fold of Congress soon, the “mistrust” seems yet to be healed.

Coronating Manmohan Singh to the high chair in 2004 was a political masterstroke by Sonia Gandhi in the wake of massive protests by BJP. But repeating the same in 2009 looks like an unpardonable mistake. Although Mr Singh is learning his lessons in politics, can India afford to bear the brunt of his tuition? Is it not more judicious to hand over the reigns to someone who is already in charge? After all that can boost the party’s electoral fortunes in 2014!

Unless history seeks to repeat itself, opportunity knocks at Congress’s door to undo the sin it committed in 1984. Pranab Mukherjee, with his political experience and leadership skills, can take India to echelons of glory.

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